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Thread: Northern China Shaolin Martial Arts Academy in Si Ping / Ji Lin

  1. #11
    As I've said before I'm looking for the absolute best experience I can find. I want to be pushed further than I have been pushed before. I'm going all the way to china, I want to get the best possible experience I can.
    Then go to the source. Why pick some wushu school way up in northern China, far from everything imaginable, when you can go to Shaolin? Why not pick Beijing University, which has far superior wushu training, and, a very large and very inhabitable city to live in? There are hundreds, if not thousands, of wushu schools in China. You're picking this one because they have a nice web site, in English. If you're going all the way to China, then go to the source. Go to Shaolin.

    The SARS stuff is getting better from what my friends tell me. I think that by July or August it might be relatively safe to go there, if it isn't now. There are checkpoints in and out of Beijing; the police are looking for people with fever or cough, so, it's still an issue. But in a few months, it should be ok. As I've said before, this is a highly communicable virus, and as such, will probably burn itself through the population it's going to burn itself through, fairly quickly.

    The response to your email regarding what degree they have is going to prove to be nothing more than entertaining.
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  2. #12
    Elrond is offline Registered Member: no custom title Registered Member
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    Ok. I'm assuming you of course are a big proponet of your master's school in Shaolin. You say I can go there for 25 dollars a day. Does this mean i will be living in the school and training all day there? In other threads you speak about training up in the mountains. This is seeming like a better and better option. His or another school you recommend would probably be great.

    Thanks for wasting so much of your time on me.

  3. #13
    You're not wasting my time. I just don't want to see you waste yours.

    I'm a big proponent of my master's school because it is a known entity to me; therefore, I can recommend it without worrying that I'm sending you to something bad. The other schools are known to me to a slighter degree, that doesn't mean that they're bad, it just means that I don't know them as well. I do know the wushu guan, having spent quite a bit of time there. I don't know Li peng's father's training, but I do know him, and I do know that he'll teach you some killer traditional stuff. So, I can therefore recommend father Peng and Decheng; at this time, I don't recommend the wushu guan or these far away from Shaolin wushu centers. (Hell, forget way the **** up in northern China and come to Vegas, we'll teach you the same thing, plus you'll have fun in your off training hours, LOL). Get my point? Go to Shaolin. There's nothing like it. And stop believing all the bullshit you see on the internet. And television for that matter, lol.
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  4. #14
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    on the ranking stuff.....
    this has nothing to do with a "rank" per se in given style. rather, it refers to the national wushu examinations that the government has been trying to push, though i dont now exactly how widespread it is to take this supposed examination. basically it was to set up to be a system by which people could be graded and sent to compete against others of comparable experience and skill. but here's the kicker...there's three different types. one is strictly for contemporary wushu and sanshou, entirely for competition. another is for traditional kung fu and is used primarily to show that a teacher knows his stuff and is all accounted for as for creditentials. the last is for scholars who research martial arts....people who practice a lot, might not be the best, but know a lot, can teach well, have done research into things like history, training methodology, etc...sort of like a donn draeger or robert smith, well, okay, those guys were good, but yeah, they were scholars and propigators...or like a yang jwing ming sort of person. but again, i know this was something they were pushing a few years ago but i havent heard anything of it since.

    paz
    -Jesse Pasleytm
    "How do I know? Because my sensei told me!"

  5. #15
    Interesting. But, I never heard of any ranks that consisted of "degrees". The ranking that I've heard of in China, which I've written about somewhere, has to do with levels, but they're not called "degrees" (that's a more Japanese thing in my opinion). They use Chinese terms (obviously) to denote these levels; the top three consisted of some Chinese term meaning "superman" or something like that, the second "gold", the third, lohan. The top level had ten members, the next level had 18 I think and the next level had 46 or so. I can't remember this exactly, but I did write about this a while back, somewhere. Maybe in the Shaolin FAQ section. Shi Xing Hong and Shi Xing Wei were members of the Lohan section; Shi De Qian made it to the top. This was the classic way of ranking people in gong fu; there was no distinction between traditional, contemporary, or teachers.

    What Jesse is talking about is intriguing; I've never heard of it. Which, I assure you, does not mean it does not exist. I'm going to have to explore this a little more the next time I go back. It certainly would be a twist if China started using a Japanese convention for an art that the Japanese were influenced by...
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  6. #16
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    doc,
    yeah, i remember that thing you had written about. i think the thing i'm talking about might be a different thing altogether. and, well, who knows what the jilin school is talking about, the website is confusing sometimes, mostly differences in the usage of language. mr che sometimes clears things up on email, but his english isnt the best, and i certainly dont trust my chinese enough to ask that way either. ehhh....
    but back to ranking and such. i remember reading about this probably 2 to 3 years ago, on raffi's wushu website. (btw, if you're into contemporary wushu, that's the place to be, nice website.) at first it was simply a means of getting a grading by your peers as to what level you should compete at. kind of like in america when you go to colligiate wushu tournaments, there's the division break down of beginner (1st year) intermediate (2nd year) advanced (3 years and up), except that, well, in china, there's probably tons of people who've been doing wushu since age six and are probably in their 20s. i think the top three levels or ranks or whatever you want to call them were designated as coaching and judging ranks. of course, the traditional gong fu guys wanted some recognition so they got their own ranking system, along with scholarly types. but i dont think it was in any way meant to be like the japanese system, where, if you have a 1st dan in a particular school, there's a very specific syllabus that you know and can perform...in the chinese system it was just there for recognition among peers.

    but.....this was a while back, i dont remember reading anything else about it since. but here's what ill do....i'll get on raffi's forum and ask, and maybe get a reply, which i will post here. okay? okay.
    -Jesse Pasleytm
    "How do I know? Because my sensei told me!"

  7. #17
    Thanks Jesse. But just for clarification sake, in Shaolin, with respect to the monks and training there, as far as I know, there are no "degree" levels of mastery. However, I can see how some of the schools, with the emergence of modern wushu and competition being ever increasingly important, might start using such a system. I'll have to look into it during my next trip.
    Experienced Community organizer. Yeah, let's choose him to run the free world. It will be historic. What could possibly go wrong...

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  8. #18
    Elrond is offline Registered Member: no custom title Registered Member
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    Anyway, Mr. Che at the Academy gave me a reply in response to my question which basically said I didn't think their were such degrees in shaolin Kung Fu:

    Dear Justin

    That's wrong.There are total Nineth degree of Chinese gong fu which from 1st to ninth.Everybody knew that whole world gong fu come from China from shao lin.

    Best regards

    Che wen long
    You can see his english isn't perfect. Is there 9 of anything in Shaolin kung fu?

  9. #19
    Well, let's backtrack a bit.

    There are nine of "something" in gong fu. Shi Xing Wei and I talked about this a while back when we were working on the planning stages for the school in Las Vegas. We talked about these nine levels of accomplishment, testing, advancement, and things like that. They were never described as "degrees" like you talk about in karate, nor are they associated with belts or things like that. It kind of goes like this:

    There are three main levels of advancement. Each level has three levels, thus, the whole concept of nine levels. The problem is, in China, there really aren't names associated with these levels, we were basically going to call them 1a, 1b, 1c, 2a, etc. Some schools actually assign animal names to each level, which is what you'll see in Shi Yanzi's school in London. The description for what each level entails is variable, and is not something that I was able to get out of Shi Xing Wei. We just didn't get to that point in great detail, he was uncertain about what exactly the delineating circumstances of each level were, and there was too many other things to get taken care of.

    If you talk to Decheng, or some of the older monks, the answer that you get about "levels" is the following. There are four levels: student, disciple, master, grandmaster. Decheng didn't get into this three levels of three stuff. Which, is interesting, because XingWei is a much younger monk. I've already discussed the differences between the two with respect to traditional and contemporary gong fu training; this whole concept of "levels" is interesting in that it just might be a relatively new concept in Shaolin, brought on by the whole traditional to contemporary change that has occurred over the years.
    Experienced Community organizer. Yeah, let's choose him to run the free world. It will be historic. What could possibly go wrong...

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  10. #20
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    Northern Shaowhat?

    Let's just say that this school has little if any Shaolin affiliation. If you want to learn Shaolin kungfu, why not go to Shaolin?? Btw, if you want an idea of what Jilin is like in the winter, just think Siberia. The teachers are too young, and don't know how to teach. If you want to know more, just ask.

    Shaolinsmonk

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